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Oxygen isotope reveals semi-aquatic habits among spinosaurid theropods for the first time
Spinosaurs were large theropod dinosaurs showing peculiar specializations, including somewhat crocodile-like elongate jaws and conical teeth. Their biology has been much discussed, and a piscivorous diet has been suggested on the basis of jaw as well as tooth morphology and stomach contents. Although fish eating has...
New finding confirms the link between dinosaurs and birds
The presence of the basal avialan Archaeopteryx in the latest Late Jurassic (Tithonian) and the poor fossil representation of more basal maniraptoran taxa in contemporaneous or slightly older deposits indicate either a gap in the stratigraphic record or, more controversially, that birds are not related to theropods....
Science:Bird-Dinosaur Link Firmed Up, And in Brilliant Technicolor
Evidence of the colour of Cretaceous dinosaurs and birds found
Spectacular fossils from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Group of northeastern China have greatly expanded our knowledge of the diversity and palaeobiology of dinosaurs and early birds, and contributed to our understanding of the origin of birds, of flight, and of feathers. Pennaceous (vaned) feathers and integumentary f...
New basal synapsid supports Laurasian origin for therapsids
Dr. June Liu, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and his collaborators, recently describe a new large predatory synapsid, Raranimus dashankouensis gen. et sp. nov., from the Middle Permian of Dashankou in China which has a unique combination of therapsid and sphe...
A new Lower Cretaceous bird from China and tooth reduction in early avian evolution

  Dr. Zhonghe Zhou, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and his colleagues, recently described a new avian genus and species, Zhongjianornis yangi gen. et sp. nov., a nearly complete and articulated skeleton, from the Lower Cretaceous lacustrine deposits of the...
A long-limbed lizard from the Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous of Daohugou, Ningcheng, Nei Mongol, China
Lizards are now relatively well known from the Jehol Group of northeastern China, seven taxa having been named from the group or equivalent horizons. Dr. Yuan Wang, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences,and his collaborator, Dr. Susan E. Evans, UniversityCollegeLondo...
A new Early Cretaceous salamander (Regalerpeton weichangensis gen. et sp. nov.) from the Huajiying Formation of northeastern China
Dr. Yuan Wang, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, and his team recently described an Early Cretaceous salamander, Regalerpeton weichangensis gen. et sp. nov., from Weichang, Hebei Province, northeastern China. Their discoveries helped resolve highly controversial aspects of caudate phylogen...
An unusual long-tailed pterosaur with elongated neck from western Liaoning of China
Dr. Xiaolin Wang and his colleagues of Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, recently described a new long-tailed pterosaur, Wukongopterus lii gen. et sp. nov, an almost complete skeleton (IVPP V15113) representing an individual with an estimated wing span of 730 mm...
CENOGRAMS OF FOSSIL MAMMALS INDICATED LATE CENOZOIC ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES IN THE LINXIA BASIN (GANSU, CHINA)
CENOGRAMS OF FOSSIL MAMMALS INDICATED LATE CENOZOIC ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES IN THE LINXIA BASIN (GANSU, CHINA)
  The evolutionary history of mammalian communities is significant for reconstructing past environments and climate. A cenogram is a rank-ordered body mass distribution of non-predatory terrestrial mammal s...
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